Can You Ever Forgive Me?

In this film adaptation of Lee Israel’s memoir of the same name, Melissa McCarthy plays Israel who has made a living as a celebrity biographer but turns to forgery when her career takes a downturn. Directed by Marielle Heller, the film also stars Jane Curtin, Richard E. Grant, and Dolly Wells.

Maw Shein Win

“Catch whispers in libraries. / Greet strangers with acorns and grapefruit. / Remember eyes, ghosts, smoke. / Watch brothers as they disappear.” Maw Shein Win reads several poems, including “Flower Instructions,” from her debut collection, Invisible Gifts (Manic D Press, 2018), for the Radar Reading series at the San Francisco Public Library in 2017. Win is featured in “5 Over 50” in the November/December issue of Poets & Writers Magazine.

Sarah Viren

“I’d say the sonnet saved me, but that would seem too dramatic. So instead I’ll ask that you imagine me four years ago: a new mom to a crying baby. A writer of two unfinished books. A queer woman marooned in West Texas. The winter rains won’t stop. I’m sad, alone, and uninspired. But then I sign up for a poetic forms class. I learn to scan. I read a curtal sonnet by Gerald Manley Hopkins, a terza rima by Gjertrud Schnackenberg, a jokey pantoum that makes me cry. And now when the baby’s screams wake me around four, I rock her tiny form without complaint and in my head I start to write a sonnet. My mind all feet. My baby now asleep. I am an essayist, not a poet, but that means nothing when I’m working on one line, trying to find or make a word that fits the sound and meat of it. Most of the time, I think of genres as crude masks we’re made to wear, but it is also true that when I struggle with my prose, I’ll stop sometimes and try to write a poem. And if I give myself just one constraint—no b’s, shaped like a tree, translated from another tongue—suddenly I am free.”
—Sarah Viren, author of Mine (University of New Mexico Press, 2018)

Writer Photo: 

Sarah Viren

“I’d say the sonnet saved me, but that would seem too dramatic. So instead I’ll ask that you imagine me four years ago: a new mom to a crying baby. A writer of two unfinished books. A queer woman marooned in West Texas. The winter rains won’t stop. I’m sad, alone, and uninspired. But then I sign up for a poetic forms class. I learn to scan. I read a curtal sonnet by Gerald Manley Hopkins, a terza rima by Gjertrud Schnackenberg, a jokey pantoum that makes me cry. And now when the baby’s screams wake me around four, I rock her tiny form without complaint and in my head I start to write a sonnet. My mind all feet. My baby now asleep. I am an essayist, not a poet, but that means nothing when I’m working on one line, trying to find or make a word that fits the sound and meat of it. Most of the time, I think of genres as crude masks we’re made to wear, but it is also true that when I struggle with my prose, I’ll stop sometimes and try to write a poem. And if I give myself just one constraint—no b’s, shaped like a tree, translated from another tongue—suddenly I am free.”
—Sarah Viren, author of Mine (University of New Mexico Press, 2018)

Writer Photo: 

Brandon Marlon

With whom do you prefer to work?: 
Adults
Ontario
In which languages are you fluent?: 
English
First Name: 
Brandon
How do you want to identify yourself?: 
Jewish
Favorite Authors: 
Moses, King David, King Solomon, Homer, Virgil, Judah HaLevi, Solomon ibn Gavirol, Moses ibn Ezra, Abraham ibn Ezra, Omar Khayyam, Rumi, Hafiz, William Shakespeare, Moliere, Victor Hugo, Yasmina Reza, Jonathan Sacks
Born in (Country): 
Canada
Last Name: 
Marlon
Male
Born in (City): 
Ottawa
work_excerpt: 
http://magazine.utoronto.ca/writers-circle/a-butterfly-on-the-rhubarb-leaves-brandon-marlon/
completed
Photo of the Author: 
Listed as: 
Fiction Writer, Poet
Are you interested in giving readings?: 
Yes
Are you willing to travel to give readings?: 
Yes
Yes
Favorite Books: 
The Tanakh, the Talmuds, The Iliad, The Odyssey, The Aeneid, The Arabian Nights, Of Human Bondage, The Grapes of Wrath, Inherit the Wind, Little Big Man, A Letter in the Scroll
Application Accepted: 
Application Accepted
Private E-mail: 
Ottawa
author_statement: 
Brandon Marlon is a writer from Ottawa, Canada. He received his B.A. in Drama & English from the University of Toronto and his M.A. in English from the University of Victoria. His poetry was awarded the Harry Hoyt Lacey Prize in Poetry (Fall 2015), and his writing has been published in 275+ publications in 30 countries. www.brandonmarlon.com
Prizes Won: 
1. Harry Hoyt Lacey Prize in Poetry (Fall 2015); 2. Canadian Jewish Playwriting Award (2007)

Brandon Marlon

With whom do you prefer to work?: 
Adults
Ontario
In which languages are you fluent?: 
English
First Name: 
Brandon
How do you want to identify yourself?: 
Jewish
Favorite Authors: 
Moses, King David, King Solomon, Homer, Virgil, Judah HaLevi, Solomon ibn Gavirol, Moses ibn Ezra, Abraham ibn Ezra, Omar Khayyam, Rumi, Hafiz, William Shakespeare, Moliere, Victor Hugo, Yasmina Reza, Jonathan Sacks
Born in (Country): 
Canada
Last Name: 
Marlon
Male
Born in (City): 
Ottawa
work_excerpt: 
http://magazine.utoronto.ca/writers-circle/a-butterfly-on-the-rhubarb-leaves-brandon-marlon/
completed
Photo of the Author: 
Listed as: 
Fiction Writer, Poet
Are you interested in giving readings?: 
Yes
Are you willing to travel to give readings?: 
Yes
Yes
Favorite Books: 
The Tanakh, the Talmuds, The Iliad, The Odyssey, The Aeneid, The Arabian Nights, Of Human Bondage, The Grapes of Wrath, Inherit the Wind, Little Big Man, A Letter in the Scroll
Application Accepted: 
Application Accepted
Private E-mail: 
Ottawa
author_statement: 
Brandon Marlon is a writer from Ottawa, Canada. He received his B.A. in Drama & English from the University of Toronto and his M.A. in English from the University of Victoria. His poetry was awarded the Harry Hoyt Lacey Prize in Poetry (Fall 2015), and his writing has been published in 275+ publications in 30 countries. www.brandonmarlon.com
Prizes Won: 
1. Harry Hoyt Lacey Prize in Poetry (Fall 2015); 2. Canadian Jewish Playwriting Award (2007)

Kelly Link

“If you’ve never read my work before, then I would hope when you read it, that you felt the way you did when you were a kid, that you felt a sense of wonder.” Kelly Link, a 2018 MacArthur “Genius” Fellowship recipient, talks about her literary influences and why she incorporates the fantastic into stories of contemporary life.

Kelly Link

“If you’ve never read my work before, then I would hope when you read it, that you felt the way you did when you were a kid, that you felt a sense of wonder.” Kelly Link, a 2018 MacArthur “Genius” Fellowship recipient, talks about her literary influences and why she incorporates the fantastic into stories of contemporary life.

Kelly Link

“If you’ve never read my work before, then I would hope when you read it, that you felt the way you did when you were a kid, that you felt a sense of wonder.” Kelly Link, a 2018 MacArthur “Genius” Fellowship recipient, talks about her literary influences and why she incorporates the fantastic into stories of contemporary life.

Kelly Link

“If you’ve never read my work before, then I would hope when you read it, that you felt the way you did when you were a kid, that you felt a sense of wonder.” Kelly Link, a 2018 MacArthur “Genius” Fellowship recipient, talks about her literary influences and why she incorporates the fantastic into stories of contemporary life.

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