Grammar Quirks: Will Schwalbe on the Word 'Unique'

Grammar Girl: What’s your favorite word and why?

Will Schwalbe: "Remarkable." The great thing about this word is that it proves itself true. If you declare something remarkable, by the very act you make it so. You’ve not only declared it worthy of attention, you’ve actually brought attention to it.

GG: What’s a word you dislike (either because it’s overused or misused) and why?

WS: "Awesome." I overuse this word and others do too. Very rarely are the things we declare awesome worthy of awe. It’s one of those words that is a product of our tendency towards hype and exaggeration. If we declare something interesting or good, we are damning it with faint praise. If we don’t say something is awesome, it’s as though we didn’t care for it at all.

GG: What word will you always misspell?

WS: I can never remember how to spell "independent." I always want to throw an "a" in there somewhere. I gather that at one time "independance" may have been a variant in English and that it has also been a common transcription error in historical documents. 

GG: What word (or semblance of a word) would you like to see added to the dictionary? Why?

WS: "Arugalid." I think we need a new noun to categorize the type of person who is fresh and a bit peppery in a delightful way. So that’s one. "Independance." That’s another. So (see above) that way I wouldn’t be entirely wrong—perhaps we could define it to mean "dancing by oneself." 

Very rarely are the things we declare awesome worthy of awe.

GG: Any grammar pet peeves we should know about?

WS: I’m one of those people who just can’t bear any adverb before "unique." You either are or you aren’t.

GG: Do you have a favorite quote or passage from an author you’d like to share?

WS: Lin Yutang, quoting the ancient scholar Yuan Chunglang, "You can leave the books that you don't like alone, and let other people read them." And also Lin Yutang on reading, "There is no proper place and time for reading. When the mood for reading comes, one can read anywhere...What, then, is the true art of reading? The simple answer is to just take up a book and read when the mood comes. To be thoroughly enjoyed, reading must be entirely spontaneous."

GG: ...

Keep reading on Quick and Dirty Tips

Grammar Quirks: Will Schwalbe on the Word 'Unique'

Grammar Girl: What’s your favorite word and why?

Will Schwalbe: "Remarkable." The great thing about this word is that it proves itself true. If you declare something remarkable, by the very act you make it so. You’ve not only declared it worthy of attention, you’ve actually brought attention to it.

GG: What’s a word you dislike (either because it’s overused or misused) and why?

WS: "Awesome." I overuse this word and others do too. Very rarely are the things we declare awesome worthy of awe. It’s one of those words that is a product of our tendency towards hype and exaggeration. If we declare something interesting or good, we are damning it with faint praise. If we don’t say something is awesome, it’s as though we didn’t care for it at all.

GG: What word will you always misspell?

WS: I can never remember how to spell "independent." I always want to throw an "a" in there somewhere. I gather that at one time "independance" may have been a variant in English and that it has also been a common transcription error in historical documents. 

GG: What word (or semblance of a word) would you like to see added to the dictionary? Why?

WS: "Arugalid." I think we need a new noun to categorize the type of person who is fresh and a bit peppery in a delightful way. So that’s one. "Independance." That’s another. So (see above) that way I wouldn’t be entirely wrong—perhaps we could define it to mean "dancing by oneself." 

Very rarely are the things we declare awesome worthy of awe.

GG: Any grammar pet peeves we should know about?

WS: I’m one of those people who just can’t bear any adverb before "unique." You either are or you aren’t.

GG: Do you have a favorite quote or passage from an author you’d like to share?

WS: Lin Yutang, quoting the ancient scholar Yuan Chunglang, "You can leave the books that you don't like alone, and let other people read them." And also Lin Yutang on reading, "There is no proper place and time for reading. When the mood for reading comes, one can read anywhere...What, then, is the true art of reading? The simple answer is to just take up a book and read when the mood comes. To be thoroughly enjoyed, reading must be entirely spontaneous."

GG: ...

Keep reading on Quick and Dirty Tips

Grammar Quirks: Will Schwalbe on the Word 'Unique'

Grammar Girl: What’s your favorite word and why?

Will Schwalbe: "Remarkable." The great thing about this word is that it proves itself true. If you declare something remarkable, by the very act you make it so. You’ve not only declared it worthy of attention, you’ve actually brought attention to it.

GG: What’s a word you dislike (either because it’s overused or misused) and why?

WS: "Awesome." I overuse this word and others do too. Very rarely are the things we declare awesome worthy of awe. It’s one of those words that is a product of our tendency towards hype and exaggeration. If we declare something interesting or good, we are damning it with faint praise. If we don’t say something is awesome, it’s as though we didn’t care for it at all.

GG: What word will you always misspell?

WS: I can never remember how to spell "independent." I always want to throw an "a" in there somewhere. I gather that at one time "independance" may have been a variant in English and that it has also been a common transcription error in historical documents. 

GG: What word (or semblance of a word) would you like to see added to the dictionary? Why?

WS: "Arugalid." I think we need a new noun to categorize the type of person who is fresh and a bit peppery in a delightful way. So that’s one. "Independance." That’s another. So (see above) that way I wouldn’t be entirely wrong—perhaps we could define it to mean "dancing by oneself." 

Very rarely are the things we declare awesome worthy of awe.

GG: Any grammar pet peeves we should know about?

WS: I’m one of those people who just can’t bear any adverb before "unique." You either are or you aren’t.

GG: Do you have a favorite quote or passage from an author you’d like to share?

WS: Lin Yutang, quoting the ancient scholar Yuan Chunglang, "You can leave the books that you don't like alone, and let other people read them." And also Lin Yutang on reading, "There is no proper place and time for reading. When the mood for reading comes, one can read anywhere...What, then, is the true art of reading? The simple answer is to just take up a book and read when the mood comes. To be thoroughly enjoyed, reading must be entirely spontaneous."

GG: ...

Keep reading on Quick and Dirty Tips

Grammar Quirks: Will Schwalbe on the Word 'Unique'

Grammar Girl: What’s your favorite word and why?

Will Schwalbe: "Remarkable." The great thing about this word is that it proves itself true. If you declare something remarkable, by the very act you make it so. You’ve not only declared it worthy of attention, you’ve actually brought attention to it.

GG: What’s a word you dislike (either because it’s overused or misused) and why?

WS: "Awesome." I overuse this word and others do too. Very rarely are the things we declare awesome worthy of awe. It’s one of those words that is a product of our tendency towards hype and exaggeration. If we declare something interesting or good, we are damning it with faint praise. If we don’t say something is awesome, it’s as though we didn’t care for it at all.

GG: What word will you always misspell?

WS: I can never remember how to spell "independent." I always want to throw an "a" in there somewhere. I gather that at one time "independance" may have been a variant in English and that it has also been a common transcription error in historical documents. 

GG: What word (or semblance of a word) would you like to see added to the dictionary? Why?

WS: "Arugalid." I think we need a new noun to categorize the type of person who is fresh and a bit peppery in a delightful way. So that’s one. "Independance." That’s another. So (see above) that way I wouldn’t be entirely wrong—perhaps we could define it to mean "dancing by oneself." 

Very rarely are the things we declare awesome worthy of awe.

GG: Any grammar pet peeves we should know about?

WS: I’m one of those people who just can’t bear any adverb before "unique." You either are or you aren’t.

GG: Do you have a favorite quote or passage from an author you’d like to share?

WS: Lin Yutang, quoting the ancient scholar Yuan Chunglang, "You can leave the books that you don't like alone, and let other people read them." And also Lin Yutang on reading, "There is no proper place and time for reading. When the mood for reading comes, one can read anywhere...What, then, is the true art of reading? The simple answer is to just take up a book and read when the mood comes. To be thoroughly enjoyed, reading must be entirely spontaneous."

GG: ...

Keep reading on Quick and Dirty Tips

Brandon Marlon

With whom do you prefer to work?: 
Adults
Ontario
In which languages are you fluent?: 
English
First Name: 
Brandon
How do you want to identify yourself?: 
Jewish
Favorite Authors: 
Moses, King David, King Solomon, Homer, Virgil, Judah HaLevi, Solomon ibn Gavirol, Moses ibn Ezra, Abraham ibn Ezra, Omar Khayyam, Rumi, Hafiz, William Shakespeare, Moliere, Victor Hugo, Yasmina Reza, Jonathan Sacks
Born in (Country): 
Canada
Last Name: 
Marlon
Male
Born in (City): 
Ottawa
work_excerpt: 
http://magazine.utoronto.ca/writers-circle/a-butterfly-on-the-rhubarb-leaves-brandon-marlon/
completed
Photo of the Author: 
Listed as: 
Fiction Writer, Poet
Are you interested in giving readings?: 
Yes
Are you willing to travel to give readings?: 
Yes
Yes
Favorite Books: 
The Tanakh, the Talmuds, The Iliad, The Odyssey, The Aeneid, The Arabian Nights, Of Human Bondage, The Grapes of Wrath, Inherit the Wind, Little Big Man, A Letter in the Scroll
Application Accepted: 
Application Accepted
Private E-mail: 
Ottawa
author_statement: 
Brandon Marlon is a writer from Ottawa, Canada. He received his B.A. in Drama & English from the University of Toronto and his M.A. in English from the University of Victoria. His poetry was awarded the Harry Hoyt Lacey Prize in Poetry (Fall 2015), and his writing has been published in 275+ publications in 30 countries. www.brandonmarlon.com
Prizes Won: 
1. Harry Hoyt Lacey Prize in Poetry (Fall 2015); 2. Canadian Jewish Playwriting Award (2007)

Brandon Marlon

With whom do you prefer to work?: 
Adults
Ontario
In which languages are you fluent?: 
English
First Name: 
Brandon
How do you want to identify yourself?: 
Jewish
Favorite Authors: 
Moses, King David, King Solomon, Homer, Virgil, Judah HaLevi, Solomon ibn Gavirol, Moses ibn Ezra, Abraham ibn Ezra, Omar Khayyam, Rumi, Hafiz, William Shakespeare, Moliere, Victor Hugo, Yasmina Reza, Jonathan Sacks
Born in (Country): 
Canada
Last Name: 
Marlon
Male
Born in (City): 
Ottawa
work_excerpt: 
http://magazine.utoronto.ca/writers-circle/a-butterfly-on-the-rhubarb-leaves-brandon-marlon/
completed
Photo of the Author: 
Listed as: 
Fiction Writer, Poet
Are you interested in giving readings?: 
Yes
Are you willing to travel to give readings?: 
Yes
Yes
Favorite Books: 
The Tanakh, the Talmuds, The Iliad, The Odyssey, The Aeneid, The Arabian Nights, Of Human Bondage, The Grapes of Wrath, Inherit the Wind, Little Big Man, A Letter in the Scroll
Application Accepted: 
Application Accepted
Private E-mail: 
Ottawa
author_statement: 
Brandon Marlon is a writer from Ottawa, Canada. He received his B.A. in Drama & English from the University of Toronto and his M.A. in English from the University of Victoria. His poetry was awarded the Harry Hoyt Lacey Prize in Poetry (Fall 2015), and his writing has been published in 275+ publications in 30 countries. www.brandonmarlon.com
Prizes Won: 
1. Harry Hoyt Lacey Prize in Poetry (Fall 2015); 2. Canadian Jewish Playwriting Award (2007)

Kelly Link

“If you’ve never read my work before, then I would hope when you read it, that you felt the way you did when you were a kid, that you felt a sense of wonder.” Kelly Link, a 2018 MacArthur “Genius” Fellowship recipient, talks about her literary influences and why she incorporates the fantastic into stories of contemporary life.

Kelly Link

“If you’ve never read my work before, then I would hope when you read it, that you felt the way you did when you were a kid, that you felt a sense of wonder.” Kelly Link, a 2018 MacArthur “Genius” Fellowship recipient, talks about her literary influences and why she incorporates the fantastic into stories of contemporary life.

Kelly Link

“If you’ve never read my work before, then I would hope when you read it, that you felt the way you did when you were a kid, that you felt a sense of wonder.” Kelly Link, a 2018 MacArthur “Genius” Fellowship recipient, talks about her literary influences and why she incorporates the fantastic into stories of contemporary life.

Kelly Link

“If you’ve never read my work before, then I would hope when you read it, that you felt the way you did when you were a kid, that you felt a sense of wonder.” Kelly Link, a 2018 MacArthur “Genius” Fellowship recipient, talks about her literary influences and why she incorporates the fantastic into stories of contemporary life.