Weekend Contest Deadlines

Planning to submit your work this weekend? The writing contests listed below all share a deadline of December 15, and offer opportunities for poets, fiction writers, and nonfiction writers looking to submit a single work or a full-length book.

Center for Book Arts Letterpress Poetry Chapbook Competition: A prize of $500 and letterpress publication by the Center for Book Arts is given annually for a poetry chapbook. The winner will also receive an additional $500 to give a reading with the contest judge at the Center for Book Arts in New York City in Fall 2019, and a weeklong residency at the Winter Shakers Program at the Millay Colony for the Arts in Austerlitz, New York. Edwin Torres will judge. Entry fee: $30.

LitMag’s Virginia Woolf Award for Short Fiction: A prize of $3,500 and publication in LitMag is given annually for a short story. A second-place prize of $1,000 will also be given. The winners will have their work reviewed by Sobel Weber Associates literary agency. The editors will judge. Entry fee: $20.

Public Poetry’s Poetry Contest: A prize of $1,000, publication in an e-book anthology, and an invitation to give a reading in Houston, Texas, is given annually for a poem on a theme. This year’s theme is “Enough.” Entry fee: $15; $20 for three poems.

Santa Fe Writers Project James Alan McPherson Award: A prize of $1,000 and publication by 2040 Books, an imprint of the Santa Fe Writers Project, is given annually for a book of fiction or creative nonfiction by a writer of color. Gish Jen will judge. Entry fee: $25.

Willow Books Literature Awards: Two prizes of $1,000 each and publication by Willow Books are given annually for a poetry collection and a book of fiction or creative nonfiction by writers of color. Entry fee: $25 for poetry; $30 for fiction or nonfiction.

Visit the contest websites for complete submission details, including eligibility guidelines and poem length requirements. For a look at more writing contests with upcoming deadlines, visit our Grants & Awards database and submission calendar.

Weekend Contest Deadlines

Planning to submit your work this weekend? The writing contests listed below all share a deadline of December 15, and offer opportunities for poets, fiction writers, and nonfiction writers looking to submit a single work or a full-length book.

Center for Book Arts Letterpress Poetry Chapbook Competition: A prize of $500 and letterpress publication by the Center for Book Arts is given annually for a poetry chapbook. The winner will also receive an additional $500 to give a reading with the contest judge at the Center for Book Arts in New York City in Fall 2019, and a weeklong residency at the Winter Shakers Program at the Millay Colony for the Arts in Austerlitz, New York. Edwin Torres will judge. Entry fee: $30.

LitMag’s Virginia Woolf Award for Short Fiction: A prize of $3,500 and publication in LitMag is given annually for a short story. A second-place prize of $1,000 will also be given. The winners will have their work reviewed by Sobel Weber Associates literary agency. The editors will judge. Entry fee: $20.

Public Poetry’s Poetry Contest: A prize of $1,000, publication in an e-book anthology, and an invitation to give a reading in Houston, Texas, is given annually for a poem on a theme. This year’s theme is “Enough.” Entry fee: $15; $20 for three poems.

Santa Fe Writers Project James Alan McPherson Award: A prize of $1,000 and publication by 2040 Books, an imprint of the Santa Fe Writers Project, is given annually for a book of fiction or creative nonfiction by a writer of color. Gish Jen will judge. Entry fee: $25.

Willow Books Literature Awards: Two prizes of $1,000 each and publication by Willow Books are given annually for a poetry collection and a book of fiction or creative nonfiction by writers of color. Entry fee: $25 for poetry; $30 for fiction or nonfiction.

Visit the contest websites for complete submission details, including eligibility guidelines and poem length requirements. For a look at more writing contests with upcoming deadlines, visit our Grants & Awards database and submission calendar.

Weekend Contest Deadlines

Planning to submit your work this weekend? The writing contests listed below all share a deadline of December 15, and offer opportunities for poets, fiction writers, and nonfiction writers looking to submit a single work or a full-length book.

Center for Book Arts Letterpress Poetry Chapbook Competition: A prize of $500 and letterpress publication by the Center for Book Arts is given annually for a poetry chapbook. The winner will also receive an additional $500 to give a reading with the contest judge at the Center for Book Arts in New York City in Fall 2019, and a weeklong residency at the Winter Shakers Program at the Millay Colony for the Arts in Austerlitz, New York. Edwin Torres will judge. Entry fee: $30.

LitMag’s Virginia Woolf Award for Short Fiction: A prize of $3,500 and publication in LitMag is given annually for a short story. A second-place prize of $1,000 will also be given. The winners will have their work reviewed by Sobel Weber Associates literary agency. The editors will judge. Entry fee: $20.

Public Poetry’s Poetry Contest: A prize of $1,000, publication in an e-book anthology, and an invitation to give a reading in Houston, Texas, is given annually for a poem on a theme. This year's theme is “Enough.” Entry fee: $15; $20 for three poems.

Santa Fe Writers Project James Alan McPherson Award: A prize of $1,000 and publication by 2040 Books, an imprint of the Santa Fe Writers Project, is given annually for a book of fiction or creative nonfiction by a writer of color. Gish Jen will judge. Entry fee: $25.

Willow Books Literature Awards: Two prizes of $1,000 each and publication by Willow Books are given annually for a poetry collection and a book of fiction or creative nonfiction by writers of color. Entry fee: $25 for poetry; $30 for fiction or nonfiction.

Visit the contest websites for complete submission details, including eligibility guidelines and poem length requirements. For a look at more writing contests with upcoming deadlines, visit our Grants & Awards database and submission calendar.

Ross Gay’s Book of Delights

Ross Gay reads from his forthcoming essay collection, The Book of Delights (Algonquin Books, 2019), at a 2017 reading in Washington, D.C. for the Field Office. Gay is featured in “Portraits of Inspiration” in the January/February issue of Poets & Writers Magazine.

Ross Gay’s Book of Delights

Ross Gay reads from his forthcoming essay collection, The Book of Delights (Algonquin Books, 2019), at a 2017 reading in Washington, D.C. for the Field Office. Gay is featured in “Portraits of Inspiration” in the January/February issue of Poets & Writers Magazine.

Ross Gay’s Book of Delights

Ross Gay reads from his forthcoming essay collection, The Book of Delights (Algonquin Books, 2019), at a 2017 reading in Washington, D.C. for the Field Office. Gay is featured in “Portraits of Inspiration” in the January/February issue of Poets & Writers Magazine.

Ross Gay’s Book of Delights

Ross Gay reads from his forthcoming essay collection, The Book of Delights (Algonquin Books, 2019), at a 2017 reading in Washington, D.C. for the Field Office. Gay is featured in “Portraits of Inspiration” in the January/February issue of Poets & Writers Magazine.

Colons

Today's topic is how to use colons.

One of my favorite old grammar books, titled "Punctuate It Right," has a wonderful name for the colon: the author calls it the mark of expectation or addition. That's because the colon signals that what comes next is directly related to the previous sentence. Often, it’s almost a definition of what came before.

Use Colons After Complete Sentences

Style guides differ significantly, however, when it comes to colons, so the most important thing is to know what style guide you should be following and what rules it recommends. The two main rules that differ are whether you can use a colon after a sentence fragment and whether you capitalize the first word after a colon.

If you don’t follow a specific style guide, you can pick the rules that you like best. Just be sure to use them consistently. Making your own personal style sheet is one way to make it easier to be consistent in the future. If you like a style, write it down.

APA Style: Complete Sentences and Capitalization

I’ll start with the style I like best, which is APA style: the style of the American Psychological Association. 

1) In APA style, you use a colon only after a complete introductory clause. In other words, after only something that could stand on its own as a complete sentence. 

Squiggly has one dream: becoming a chocolatier. (correct in APA style)

Squiggly bought: chocolate chips, butter, and a spatula. (incorrect in APA style)

2) In APA style, you capitalize the first word after a colon if it’s the start of at least one complete sentence (or of course, if it’s a proper noun).

Squiggly has one dream: He dreams of becoming a chocolatier. (correct in APA style)

Squiggly has one dream: he dreams of becoming a chocolatier. (incorrect in APA style)

So in APA style, you can use a colon only after a complete sentence, and you capitalize the first word after a colon when it’s the start of a complete sentence. 


Chicago Style: Complete Sentences and Less Capitalization...

Keep reading on Quick and Dirty Tips

Colons

Today's topic is how to use colons.

One of my favorite old grammar books, titled "Punctuate It Right," has a wonderful name for the colon: the author calls it the mark of expectation or addition. That's because the colon signals that what comes next is directly related to the previous sentence. Often, it’s almost a definition of what came before.

Use Colons After Complete Sentences

Style guides differ significantly, however, when it comes to colons, so the most important thing is to know what style guide you should be following and what rules it recommends. The two main rules that differ are whether you can use a colon after a sentence fragment and whether you capitalize the first word after a colon.

If you don’t follow a specific style guide, you can pick the rules that you like best. Just be sure to use them consistently. Making your own personal style sheet is one way to make it easier to be consistent in the future. If you like a style, write it down.

APA Style: Complete Sentences and Capitalization

I’ll start with the style I like best, which is APA style: the style of the American Psychological Association. 

1) In APA style, you use a colon only after a complete introductory clause. In other words, after only something that could stand on its own as a complete sentence. 

Squiggly has one dream: becoming a chocolatier. (correct in APA style)

Squiggly bought: chocolate chips, butter, and a spatula. (incorrect in APA style)

2) In APA style, you capitalize the first word after a colon if it’s the start of at least one complete sentence (or of course, if it’s a proper noun).

Squiggly has one dream: He dreams of becoming a chocolatier. (correct in APA style)

Squiggly has one dream: he dreams of becoming a chocolatier. (incorrect in APA style)

So in APA style, you can use a colon only after a complete sentence, and you capitalize the first word after a colon when it’s the start of a complete sentence. 


Chicago Style: Complete Sentences and Less Capitalization...

Keep reading on Quick and Dirty Tips

Colons

Today's topic is how to use colons.

One of my favorite old grammar books, titled "Punctuate It Right," has a wonderful name for the colon: the author calls it the mark of expectation or addition. That's because the colon signals that what comes next is directly related to the previous sentence. Often, it’s almost a definition of what came before.

Use Colons After Complete Sentences

Style guides differ significantly, however, when it comes to colons, so the most important thing is to know what style guide you should be following and what rules it recommends. The two main rules that differ are whether you can use a colon after a sentence fragment and whether you capitalize the first word after a colon.

If you don’t follow a specific style guide, you can pick the rules that you like best. Just be sure to use them consistently. Making your own personal style sheet is one way to make it easier to be consistent in the future. If you like a style, write it down.

APA Style: Complete Sentences and Capitalization

I’ll start with the style I like best, which is APA style: the style of the American Psychological Association. 

1) In APA style, you use a colon only after a complete introductory clause. In other words, after only something that could stand on its own as a complete sentence. 

Squiggly has one dream: becoming a chocolatier. (correct in APA style)

Squiggly bought: chocolate chips, butter, and a spatula. (incorrect in APA style)

2) In APA style, you capitalize the first word after a colon if it’s the start of at least one complete sentence (or of course, if it’s a proper noun).

Squiggly has one dream: He dreams of becoming a chocolatier. (correct in APA style)

Squiggly has one dream: he dreams of becoming a chocolatier. (incorrect in APA style)

So in APA style, you can use a colon only after a complete sentence, and you capitalize the first word after a colon when it’s the start of a complete sentence. 


Chicago Style: Complete Sentences and Less Capitalization...

Keep reading on Quick and Dirty Tips
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